The History of the Delco-Remy Divsion of General Motors
A.K.A. "The Remy Brothers" or "The Remy Electric Company"
1896-1994
Delco-Remy at the Normandy Invasion, June 6, 1944   Our War Job

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Batteries    Delcotrons    Heated Windshield   Heavy Duty   Horns   Ignition   Magnequench   MISAR   Missile Battery   Propulsion Systems for Electric Vehicles   Regulators    Shock Absorbers  Starters   Switches

Products
Heated Windshield

The Delco-Remy portion of the Heated Windshield system included the Power Electronics Module shown on the right below for switching the high current on and off to the windshield, a control module shown on the left that determined the when the Power Module switched, and a CS-144 Delcotron with three output terminals to the Power Module added.  Also part of the system was a special windshield with a electrically conductive film sandwiched within the glass laminate.  The film was a large resistor which when supplied with current from the DR Power Module heated up the windshield and could melt a 0.1inch of ice off the surface five times faster than a normal defrost system.  The special windshield was the weak link in the system as it was prone to cracking, failure of the resistive film and also gave an orange tint to the glass.  Due to the windshield issues this special order item only lasted several years in the early 1990's. 


The Power Module was assembled in Plant 11.  Gene Phillips Photo


It appears that the DR Power Module takes the non rectified AC off the generator and then converted it to something besides the normal 12 volts DC.  There were three transformers in the unit, which was produced on the south side of the fire wall in Plant 11 near the vacuum department.


ElectriClear was the GM trade name for this product.  Ford called its version QuickClear or sometimes InstaClear.  After the warranty ran out, and if the resistive heating element failed in the windshield, some owners were reported to have thrown rocks at the windshield to get the insurance companies to replace the glass as road damage with the typical low deductable versus having to pay the full cost of the replacement.  This was not a cheap windshield.  The metallic heating element was also known to have also interfered with electronic equipment being used in the vehicle and automatic toll road monitoring signals.

 

 

Home  History   The Plants   Plant Photos   Moments in Time  The Products   Product Brochures   Service Manuals   Training Booklets   Video  Employment Numbers   Museums   Sources  Allied Divisions   Revisions   Reunions   Remy Electric Country Club   Vintage Literature about The Remy Electric Company   Links

This Website has no affiliation with General Motors, Delphi Holdings or Remy International.  The content is to only present a historical perspective of the plants and products of the former Delco-Remy Division previous to 1994.  All content
presented on this website is for general information only.   Website designed and maintained by David D Jackson  2010-2013.  
Contact:  David D Jackson