The History of the Delco-Remy Divsion of General Motors
A.K.A. "The Remy Brothers" or "The Remy Electric Company"
1896-1994
Delco-Remy at the Normandy Invasion, June 6, 1944   World War Two Products and Product Applications    The Army-Navy "E" Award   Our War Job

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Delco-Remy in World War Two
Antioch Foundry, Yellow Springs, OH

This page added 1-14-2017.

It is ironic that all of the original core Delco-Remy plants in Anderson and Muncie, IN that produced products during WWII no longer exist, but one plant that DR temporarily took over during the war still exists today. 


The Antioch Foundry in Yellow Springs, OH during WWII  Note the small tree growing in front of the fence to the left of the flagpole.   Photo courtesy of the Morris Bean and Company.


The Antioch Theater today.  Note how the tree has grown!  The dirt road is now paved.  Author's photo August 2016.


There is an award ceremony going on.  This photo is looking north along the wall facing the street.  The white house is no longer there.  It has been replaced by a modern brick building as part of Antioch College.   Photo courtesy of the Morris Bean and Company.


The same wall facing the street today.  Note the white house is gone.  Author's photo August 2016.


Morris Bean inspects a exhaust manifold casting while an employee de-burrs another casting.   Photo courtesy of the Morris Bean and Company.


These are diesel blower rotors that Plant Five Anderson produced for Detroit Diesel during WWII.  Antioch Foundry developed the casting methods used by Plant Five.   Photo courtesy of the Morris Bean and Company.


 Photo courtesy of the Morris Bean and Company.


Today the former Delco-Remy Antioch foundry is the theater at Antioch College.  Author's photo August 2016.


Author's photo August 2016.


Author's photo August 2016.


Author's photo August 2016.


After WWII the Antioch Foundry was transferred to the Allison Division of GM.  Later it was sold off and became the Morris Bean and Company.  Today Morris Bean still exists in a newer structure a half mile to the south of the Antioch Theater.  Author's photo August 2016.

Delco-Remy is long gone.  Plant One, the iconic symbol and headquarters building many of us worked of the GM Division, was razed many years ago.  The Remy name which endured after the 1994 breakup of the Delco-Remy Division as Remy, disappeared in 2016 when Borg-Warner bought the company.  Yet this small foundry building and the resulting company that was just a footnote in DR history still exists today.  After WWII the Antioch Foundry passed from the control of Delco-Remy to the Allison Division of GM.  Later is was purchased by Morris Bean, who along with his wife, were the intellectual and technical forces at Antioch.  It still exists today as the Morris Bean and Company along with the original building in Yellow Springs, OH. 

It is funny how things work out.


Today Morris Bean manufactures precision castings.  Author's photo 2016.


Author's photo 2016.


Author's photo 2016.

Delco-Remy in WWII  DR WWII Aircraft Products   DR WWII Marine Equipment DR WWII Tank Products   DR WWII Vehicle Products DR and LST-393   DR WWII Kings Mills Plant

 

 

 

Delco-Remy at the Normandy Invasion, June 6, 1944   World War Two Products and Product Applications   The Army-Navy "E" Award   Our War Job
Home  History   The Plants   Plant Photos   Moments in Time  The Products   Product Brochures   Service Manuals   Training Booklets   Video  Employment Numbers   Museums   Sources  Allied Divisions   Revisions   Reunions   Remy Electric Country Club   Vintage Literature about The Remy Electric Company   Links

This Website has no affiliation with General Motors, Delphi Holdings, Remy International, or Borg-Warner.  The content is to only present a historical perspective of the plants and products of the former Delco-Remy Division previous to 1994.  All content
presented on this website is for general information only.   Website designed and maintained by David D Jackson.  
Contact:  David D Jackson